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Showing posts from September, 2011

Painting the Farm

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Oh, the critique - guess what all of them did not like - the Cobalt blue "Parrish" sky. They said, since my instructions were to "paint the land", the blue sky was the first thing their eyes were drawn to, that it was a distraction from the "LAND". So - good-bye to my cobalt blue sky. This is the finished painting I will be submitting for the show.

Painting the Farm

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Finally, nearly finished. I added a hint of the farm house and barn. My "Parrish" sky is just as imagined it would be. I've sent the photo off to some friends for a critique.

Painting the Farm

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Maxfield Parrish used a glazing technique in his paintings, only he used oils and I am using acrylics. He was famous for his COBALT BLUE SKIES, so much so that a cobalt blue skies in a landscape paintings came to be known as a PARRISH SKY.

You're probably wondering why this version doesn't look much different than the last one - the changes are subtle - I agree. But I have added more that 6 to 8 new layers of color. It is a very slow process.

Painting the Farm

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I am using the glazing technique for this painting.
Just like the colored pencils I love so much, I am painting many layers of
 transparent paint to reach the color I desire.

Painting the Farm

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My instruction for painting this farm are to"paint the land", the buildings should not be the main focus. Which is why I chose this panoramic view. There will be a slight view of the house and barn, tucked behind the trees.




Painting the Farm

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UNDERPAINTING

The painting has officially begun. I've chosen to do the underpainting in lights and darks using purple and yellow.




Painting the Farm

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Time for supplies, I was going to order from my favorite art supplier - Dick Blick - but I know I would order way more than I need, so it was off to AC Moore with my 40% coupon.


With my newly aquired 36 x 24" canvas and my charcoal pencils, I've sketched the farm. A little spray fixative and a light coat of watered down gesso to seal the charcoal.